Mind: Given Medicine, the Patients Improved. They Continued to be in Shackles Anyway.

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Individuals with severe mental disorders endure abuse all over the world, caged, warehoused in institutions, and imprisoned. But individuals living chained to trees or concrete blocks in areas of Africa are some of the most trapped, forgotten people on the planet.

One method to finish or lessen the reliance upon this practice, some experts have contended, is always to introduce Western psychiatry — supplying the shackled with diagnoses and medicine. One religious leader in Ghana made the decision the idea, despite concerns concerning the drugs and intimations of cultural imperialism, was worth testing. He ran a retreat, or prayer camp, where lots of everyone was chained.

Now, in the present publication of the The British Journal of Psychiatry, a group of Ghanaian and American researchers report outcomes of a test in the camp, the very first controlled trial of medications among shackled individuals with mental problems in West Africa.

The findings were mixed: Medications, mostly for psychosis, blunted day-to-day signs and symptoms of hallucinations and delusional thinking. But it didn’t reduce the amount of time everyone was locked in chains in the camp.

“We will not medicate our way to avoid it of these types of human legal rights abuses,” stated Dr. Robert Rosenheck, a professor of psychiatry at Yale College School Of Medicine, who designed the trial and it was a co-author from the report. In West Africa, countless individuals with mental illness reside in awful conditions. One organization is fighting for any new method of treatment. This video was based on The Worldwide Reporting Center.Printed OnMarch. 11, 2015CreditImage by Linda Givetash

Dr. Angela Ofori-Atta, an affiliate professor of psychiatry in the College of Ghana Med school and Dentistry, brought the research and arranged use of chained participants in the prayer camp. She stated the treatment created some dramatic individual enhancements — one man, shackled for ten years, grew to become strikingly lucid the very first time in memory — which more…

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Obesity Was Rising as Ghana Embraced Fast Food. Then Came KFC.

ACCRA, Ghana — After finishing high school a decade ago, Daniel Awaitey enrolled in computer courses, dropped out to work in a hotel, then settled into a well-paying job in the booming oil sector here.
He has an apartment, a car, a smartphone and a long-distance girlfriend he met on a dating website. So he had reasons and the means to celebrate his 27th birthday in late July. His boss and co-workers joined him for an evening of laughter and selfies, lingering over dinner at his favorite restaurant: KFC.
Mr. Awaitey first learned about the fried chicken chain on Facebook. The “finger lickin’ good” slogan caught his attention and it has lived up to expectations. “The food is just ——” he said, raising his fingertips to his mouth and smacking his lips. “When you taste it you feel good.”
Ghana, a coastal African country of more than 28 million still etched with pockets of extreme poverty, has enjoyed unprecedented national prosperity in the last decade, buoyed by offshore oil. Though the economy slowed abruptly not long ago, it is rebounding and the signs of new fortune are evident: millions moving to cities for jobs, shopping malls popping up and fast food roaring in to greet people hungry for a contemporary lifestyle. Chief among the corporate players is KFC, and its parent company, YUM!, which have muscled northward from South Africa — where KFC has about 850 outlets and a powerful brand name — throughout sub-Saharan Africa: to Angola, Tanzania, Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Ghana and beyond. The company brings the flavors that have made it popular in the West, seasoned with an intangible: the symbolic association of fast food with rich nations. But KFC’s expansion here comes as obesity and related health problems have been surging. Public health officials see fried chicken, french fries and pizza as spurring and intensifying a global obesity epidemic that has hit hard in Ghana — one of 73…

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